Research

Innovation, Collaboration, Discovery.

We work at the intersection of human, animal, and environmental health. Our expertise in the life sciences forms the foundation of our biomedical, environmental health, and veterinary research.

To solve complex problems facing our planet, we invest in basic science, applied science, and emerging infectious diseases, and in the discovery and delivery of new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tools.

World-Renowned Research

Animal Health
Biological Systems
Cancer
Environmental Health
Imaging and Diagnostics
Infectious Disease
Orthopedics
Reproduction
70% of students work in a research laboratory
3 dozen + ongoing clinical trials
$258 million in research expenditures in FY2018

Centers and Institutes

Home to diverse biomedical, environmental health, and veterinary research programs that advance science and technology to improve and save lives, our centers and institutes promote scholarship in teaching, training and research, provide academic support services, and perform outreach consistent with the mission of the University.

Explore Centers and Institutes

Foundational research is hard. Scientists are true pioneers of the 21st century. We stand at the horizon of discovery with no manual or textbook to reference when generating new ideas and how to test them. We simply climb on the shoulders of scientists who pushed forward the scientific frontier before us. Up to 90% of our experiments fail. But that makes that one experiment in ten that reveals something new all the more exciting and rewarding.

Dr. Mark Zabel, Associate Dean for Research

Student Research Opportunities

Undergraduate and graduate students can participate in hands-on learning experiences through mentorship from faculty, and connecting with researchers and peers.

Animal Health Innovation Fund

From developing new drug therapies for common cancers in dogs to better treatments for feline liver failure, the Animal Health Innovation fund catalyzes clinical research to ensure animals live longer, better lives. With help from clinics, veterinarians, alumni, and other generous supporters, our faculty aim to address the increasing demand for relevant research in improving animal health.

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Squeakers the cat

Research News

More Research Stories

New York Times: Cats Are Better Than Dogs (at Catching the Coronavirus)

Fortunately, infected cats appear to show mild symptoms at most. “I am still a bit surprised that cats are so readily infected and yet rarely exhibit any signs of illness,” said Dr. Angela Bosco-Lauth, a biomedical researcher at Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences who was not involved with the research.

Today’s Veterinary Business: VetDC’s Canine Lymphoma Drug Makes History

Full FDA approval of Tanovea is the first of its kind, offering hope to the owners of tens of thousands of dogs. The Fort Collins company was launched in 2010 through a partnership with Colorado State University’s Flint Animal Cancer Center.

The Long Fight: Researchers tackle neurodegenerative diseases across species

Boettcher Investigator Julie Moreno and Dr. Stephanie McGrath conduct translational research in dogs with the goal of developing diagnostics and treatments for neurodegenerative diseases in humans.

CSU researchers make first-ever discovery of Zika virus RNA in free-ranging African bats

Detection of nucleic acid in bats in the wild indicates that they are naturally infected or exposed through the bite of infected mosquitoes.

Pandemic Proof

The pandemic is far from over, yet the past year contains ample proof that the College will help end it. We spoke to faculty, staff, and students who have contributed to this massive effort, and from their stories we distilled the 10 practices that make us pandemic-proof.

Conversation: Alex Bailey & Rushika Perera

A chat with Dr. Rushika Perera, an associate professor of virology and the chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, and Alex Bailey, a member of the College’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee and a third-year student in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program.

Resources